so(cial)co(nsumer)centric

dennys:

sprawlerr:

why does dennys have a tumblr

why do you

Instead, I use Tinder in the way a user I recently came across described so well on her profile: “I’m not here to date; I just love this swiping game.” All I do is thumb left or right, and when, a message pops up saying someone has “liked” me too, I get a little thrill of satisfaction—and then I get back to swiping. What I want from Tinder isn’t dates or casual sex or romance, it’s the same thing I want from Twitter, Facebook, and quite possibly this article you’re reading right now: affirmation—some signal from the outside world that I exist, and that I might be worthy.
One of the first items sold on [eBay] was a broken laser pointer for $14.83. Astonished, Omidyar contacted the winning bidder to ask if he understood that the laser pointer was broken. In his responding email, the buyer explained: “I’m a collector of broken laser pointers.”
kenyatta:

theonion:

Content Could Be Hotter, More Social
According to a recent poll of various web-based media producers, content could be hotter, more social, more shareable. “While there is certainly buzzworthy content out there, some of which is even snackable, I do think content in general could be more relevant, more bite-size, and make a stronger brand impression with trending keywords and a more responsive design,” poll respondent Mark Zeligman told reporters, noting that the last piece of content he came across was an infographic that was neither flexible, timely, viral, nor engineered to maximize reader engagement.
 thx molly

kenyatta:

theonion:

Content Could Be Hotter, More Social

According to a recent poll of various web-based media producers, content could be hotter, more social, more shareable. “While there is certainly buzzworthy content out there, some of which is even snackable, I do think content in general could be more relevant, more bite-size, and make a stronger brand impression with trending keywords and a more responsive design,” poll respondent Mark Zeligman told reporters, noting that the last piece of content he came across was an infographic that was neither flexible, timely, viral, nor engineered to maximize reader engagement.

thx molly
grawly:

tetseo:

chordn:

nawstawlgia:

grawly:

rodimusprimeofficial:

xaldins:

you cold bro?

Feel the heat with these epic games.

you cold bro?

Feel the heat with these epic games.

You cold bro?

Feel the heat with these epic games.

you cold bro?

grawly:

tetseo:

chordn:

nawstawlgia:

grawly:

rodimusprimeofficial:

xaldins:

you cold bro?

Feel the heat with these epic games.

you cold bro?

Feel the heat with these epic games.

You cold bro?

Feel the heat with these epic games.

you cold bro?

As part of their experiment, the researchers presented more than 500 men and women with variations of a Google Chrome warning incorporated one of the following angles:

  • Influence of authority
  • Social influence
  • Concrete threats
  • Vague threats

“What works best is to make the warning concrete; people ignore general warnings such as that a web page ‘might harm your computer,’ but do pay attention to a specific one such as that the page would ‘try to infect your computer with malware designed to steal your bank account and credit card details in order to defraud you.’”

“Warning text should include a clear and non-technical description of potential negative outcome or an informed direct warning given from a position of authority,” the researchers ultimately deduced.

Concrete threats – when individuals have a clear idea of what is happening and how much they are exposing themselves – wound up being the No. 1 predictor of click-through resistance.

The experiment found that authority – when the warnings come from trusted sources – was the No. 2 predictor. Trusted figures “elicit compliance” and in the study, can even extend to include Facebook friends.

Those who’ve read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory—or who’ve seen the popular film adaptations—may remember that the gum experiment doesn’t end so well. Greedy Violet Beauregarde is so grasping and eager that she doesn’t bother to listen to Mr. Wonka’s warning (it’s “not quite right yet”) and chews away, turning herself into a giant blueberry at the end of the otherwise delicious gum-meal. I wonder if social media are something like that gum: satisfying to a point, but also harmful in unexpected ways.

kenyatta:

floozys:

image

image

tesco mobile is not fucking around anymore 

Culturally aware, empowering (to those who buy the service for economic reasons), and owning it. Well done.

newyorker:

A cartoon by Bruce Eric Kaplan. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1eVO5e7

newyorker:

A cartoon by Bruce Eric Kaplan. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1eVO5e7